Individual Notes

Note for:   Lawrence Leslie Budine,,   23 Aug 1929 - 8 Dec 1994         Index

Individual Note:
      MILITARY SERVICE: From the Oneonta Star, 1952..."Walton Man Stationed on Hokkaido - With the First Cavalry Division in Japan. -- Pfc. Lawrence L. Budine, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence L. Budine, 17 Howell St., Walton, is serving with the combat-tested First Cavalry Division on Hokkaido, northernmost island of Japan. The division, units of which fought Indians from horseback a century ago, now is taking to skis and snowshoes for training in Arctic warfare after17 months' frontline duty in Korea. Budine, a mortar gunner in Company D of the Eighth Cavalry Regiment, arrived in Korea in June, 1951, and has won the Combat Infantryman Badge and the Korean Service Ribbon with one campaign star."
        Larry delivered Home Heating Oil in Walton for many years.



Individual Notes

Note for:   James Thomas Budine,   11 Apr 1933 - 28 Aug 2002         Index

Individual Note:
      MARRIAGE: Walton Reporter, 1932 - James T. Budine weds Marian S. Storrer in Ceremony at Walton
        The marriage of Miss Marian S. Storrer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Storrer of Walton and James T. Budine, also of Walton, took place May 28 in the Methodist parsonage with the Rev. Henry G. Lincoln officiating.
        The bride wore a dress of aqua nylon marquisette with white accessories and a corsage of white sweet peas and pink rosebuds.
        Mrs. Herschel McClenon of Walton, a sister of the bride was dressed in yellow nylon marquisette with white accessories and had a corsage of white sweet peas and yellow rosebuds.
        Paul Lakin, a brother of the bridegroom of Walton was best man.
        A reception for the immediate families was held at the home of the bride‚Äôs sister. A three-tiered wedding cake was served with the refreshments.
        Following a wedding trip to Niagara Falls, the couple will live at 7 Bruce St. in Walton.
        The bride graduated from Walton Central School in 1949 and is employed in the law office of Paul F. Eaton, mayor of Walton. The bridegroom attended Walton Central School and is employed by Scintilla Magneto.
        James had a daughter.
        SECOND MARRIAGE: James had a second wife whose name was Lorraine Pritts.



Individual Notes

Note for:   Gerald Walter Schriber,   8 Apr 1916 - 10 Mar 1978         Index

Individual Note:
     Gerald lived in Georgia.



Individual Notes

Note for:   Betty (Jean) Talbot,    -          Index

Individual Note:
      BRIDAL SHOWER: Newspaper article..."Edmeston--Mrs. Betty Talbot, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Howard P. Talbot, Edmeston, was honored at a bridal shower given in the home of Mrs. Lynn C. Huestis Monday night. Those present for the affair were: Mrs. H.P. Talbot, Mrs. C.C. Houk, Mrs. Florence Jacobs, Mrs. E. Sydney Smith, Mrs. S.C. Langworthy, Mrs. George Wilson, Mrs. Merton Kelty, Mrs. M.O. Shatzel, Mrs. H.J. Schworm, and Mrs. Huestis. The evening was spent playing pinochle. High scores were won by Mrs. Talbot and Mrs. Shatzel. The consolation was won by Mrs. Wilson. The bride-to-be was presented with a blanket. Miss Talbot will become the bride of Robert Schriber of Schenectady June 1."



Individual Notes

Note for:   Oscar Martin Schriber Jr.,   22 Jan 1929 -          Index

Individual Note:
     Nickname "Ozzie." Oscar is retired living in Amsterdam, NY. Military service in Korean War; US Force Europe. Served in Artillery in Europe and in Korea. Awarded Purple Heart and Bronze Star.



Individual Notes

Note for:   John Harding Phoenix,   27 Jul 1819 - 19 Dec 1908         Index

Individual Note:
      ANTI-RENT WAR: From the American Encyclopedia: Anti-rent Movement, a political protest against the semi-manorial system of land tenures in New York state. It began in Albany in 1839 and spread throughout the central part of the state. In the 17th century the Dutch and the English had granted large tracts of public land to the Van Rensselaer, Livingston, and other families. The land had then been leased to tenant farmers, who paid annual rents and taxes, owed feudal obligations, and had no rights to mines or mill sites. This system continued well into the 19th century, but, by the 1830's, Hudson Valley farmers believed that the leaseholds were a direct violation of the Declaration of Independence. It was time, they felt, to abolish slavery, promote temperance, and end an economic system that relegated them to being semi-serfs.
        The event that catalyzed the anti-rent agitation was the death of Stephen Van Rensselaer, the landlord of a large estate in Albany and Rensselaer counties. His will instructed his two heirs to collect $400,000 in back rent in order to balance outstanding debts, but their attempts to obey the injunction met with resistance and promoted similar demonstrations on neighboring estates. The anti-renters, dressed as Indians, resisted state militia units and tarred and feathered hostile sheriffs. A high pitch of violence was reached on August 7, 1845, when Deputy Sheriff Osman Steele was killed in Delaware County. Governor Silas Wright declared a state of insurrection. More than 50 men were tried and convicted, and two of them received life sentences for their actions.
        The campaign of violence had failed, but the anti-rent movement was not ended. Both the Whigs and the Democrats recognized the value of farmer support. In June 1846 the state constitutional convention, meeting in Albany, abolished manorial obligations and limited leases to 12 years. In the subsequent gubernatorial election, Whig candidate John Young, with anti-rent endorsements, defeated incumbent Wright. Young redeemed his campaign promises, pardoning the participants in the Steele murder and directing his attorney general to institute proceedings against defective titles. The great estates were being gradually divided, and the ballot box, not tar and feathers, led to the anti-rent victory.
        James Fenimore Cooper described incidents in the anti-rent movement from a conservative position in "The Littlepage Manuscripts", a trilogy consisting of the novels "Satanstoe" (1845), "The Chainbearer" (1845), and "The Redskins" (1846).
        Note: Books written about the Anti-Rent War: Tin Horns and Calico, by Henry Christman, Hope Farm Press, Cornwallville, NY (1978). For children: Calico and Tin Horns, by Candace Christiansen, ISBN 0-8037-1179-4, (1992). Max Constable said the best book on the subject is "Tin Horns and Calico" (a copy of which he owned).
        OBITUARY: Walton Reporter, Dec 1908: Was in Anti-Rent War and Later Fought for the Union in Civil War--John Phoenix Dies at Ripe Age of 90 Years. John Phoenix died at his home at Cleaver Dec. 19th, in his 90th year. Deceased was born at Cabin Hill July 27, 1819, town of Andes, where his father, one of the early settlers of the county, had moved to as early as 1794 and settled on a farm. He grew up with the county and was a rugged, healthy man up to a few weeks before his death. He participated in the anti-rent riots during the early 40's and was one of the band who were brought to Delhi jail for the shooting of Deputy Sheriff Osmond Steel and with the rest of the party was confined for a time [in Dannemora State Prison] and afterwards pardoned by Gov. Young. Shortly after being pardoned he married Margaret Munson, who died 9 years ago. From that union he leaves behind him to mourn his loss 4 children, 28 grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren; a record to be proud of as a sturdy pioneer of Delaware county. On September 2, 1864, he enlisted as a Union private in the Civil War, being a member of Co. G, 144th N.Y.V.I., and was discharged 9 months and 23 days later on June 25, 1865 with chronic diarrhea. Shortly after the war or in 1870, he moved to the farm at Cleaver, (P.O. address, Loomis) then known as Loomis brook where he died. He was a hard working, industrious man and with his noble wife soon cleared up the place and had it one of the best paying farms in the valley. Born at a time when schools were few and land must be cleared, he did not have the advantages of an education but made sure his children should. He could neither read or write.
        Since the death of his wife his son Aaron and wife have tenderly cared for him. The funeral was held at his late residence Tuesday, the 22nd, at 11a.m., conducted by the Rev. Gritman of Cannonsville. Interment in the family plot at Trout Creek cemetery. The children are Aaron, at home; Hannah, wife of John Gilbert; Estelle, wife of Aaron Franks; Annie, wife of James Constable. Cause of death was old age and an attack of heart trouble.
        MISC: According to Marianne (McCaffrey) Greenfield, John was a prisoner in Andersonville during the Civil War and returned home with his hair turned completely white. Lucille Dewey's records indicate that he entered the Civil War Sep 1864 for 1 year as PVT in the 144th NYV. His age was listed as 43 born in Delaware County and married.