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Individual Notes

Note for:   Dr. Eleanor Bridge Kilham,   3 Apr 1858 - 6 Apr 1937         Index

Individual Note:
      Eleanor was named for Eleanor I. Bridge Lovett who had been named for Eleanor Bridge Ingersoll, the sister of Richard Perkins Bridge. She attended Robinson Seminary in Exeter, N. H., and graduated from Wheaton Seminary in 1876 where she later became an alumna member of Phi Beta Kappa. She obtained her medical degree in 1882 from the Woman's College of the New York Infirmary for Women and Children and later studied in Zurich and Vienna for two years. She was successively intern, resident physician, attending physician in the New York Infirmary and was Adjunct Professor and later Professor of Obstetrics in the Women’s College.
        Eleanor was a member of the New York Academy of Medicine. She had a small practice among wealthy families where she brought many of their children into the world. She spent a great part of her time in settlement work among the foreign poor of New York City. At this time she lived in an apartment with Miss Julia DeForest. During World War I she spent three and one half years in dispensaries, French hospitals, and especially in civilian medical work immediately behind the front lines. She received three decorations from the French Government for her refugee work in connection with the American Committee for the French Wounded in Paris. She established and conducted a medical clinic at Gerberville, France.
        Now on display at the Beverly Historical Society are her Phi Beta Kappa key and two medals - Medaille d’Honneur and Medaille de Reconaissance d’Honneur.
        She wrote fascinating letters detailing her experiences which her sister Frances had reproduced in condensed form in a book "Letters from France 1915-1919" edited by Miss Carolyn Clewes.
        Eleanor traveled extensively all over the world with friends and with her sisters. In 1914 she, with Mrs. Custis, widow of General Custis, and Miss Wild, a social worker, went up the Yangtze River in a junk with a Chinese crew.
        Eleanor was a 'well-read person', keeping up with the new books, a constant attendant at the New York Philharmonic concerts, frequently with ladies she attended as a physician. Her sister Frances endowed a chair at The Town Hall where she went regularly for lectures. She lived at an important woman's club where she had many friends. She spent the last few years of her life with her sister Frances in Beverly.



Individual Notes

Note for:   Edward Kilham,   1 Feb 1859 - 11 Jul 1902         Index

Individual Note:
     Edward had tuberculosis and was sent to California, rough as it was, for what at that time was thought to be the cure. He was quite a man about town and most of his photos are in evening dress. He was a great favorite of his mother's and she went out to visit him on the ranch which was attacked by Indians.



Individual Notes

Note for:   Florence Kilham,   19 Nov 1860 -          Index

Individual Note:
     Florence and Charles lived in San Diego, California.



Individual Notes

Note for:   Jane Kilham,   26 Dec 1896 -          Index

Individual Note:
     No issue. Live in Allston section of Boston.



Individual Notes

Note for:   Albert H. Austin,   23 Feb 1892 -          Index

Individual Note:
     Albert is a sales representative for the Cohoes Carrybag Co., Inc.



Individual Notes

Note for:   Charles Rodman Kilham,   25 Apr 1899 - 6 Jan 1964         Index

Individual Note:
      Rodman, immediately from high school, enlisted in the Marine Corps and served fifteen months in Foreign Service in World War I. He played professional football in Boston for five years and then was in the leather business in Boston. In 1936 he moved to Milwaukee and was president and owner of the A. R. Mueller Company (leather) until his death.
        Rod was a great sportsman, hunter, and fisherman. He was state champion in badminton in 1940; won the Ozankee Country Club and Milwaukee Country Club golf championship, and was active in Ducks Unlimited.
        Ann, writing of Rod, said "He was a very unusual person; one of the happiest, kindest, most generous and a thoroughly fine man." His funeral service was attended by 450 of his friends.